Workshops

Workshop 1
International Perspectives and Approaches to Supporting and Retaining First in Family Students

Workshop Description:

Students who are the first in their family to come to university comprise over 50% of the Australian university population (Spiegler & Bednarek, 2013). This is a cohort that is highly intersected by a diversity of equity categorisations and as a result, are recognised as being more at-risk of early departure from the HE setting. This workshop has a dual fold purpose: it will first report on recent trends, initiatives and research that focuses on supporting this cohort on a global basis drawing on  work in the US, Canada and the UK. Based on this broader context, current approaches in Australia will be shared and importantly, the ways in which these strategies might be adapted or considered in the context of participants’ own institutions critically interrogated. Overall, the objective of this workshop is to explore how HE institutions can broadly consider the FiF cohort and how these students might be engaged in a productive and positive manner in order to ensure better academic outcomes. The workshop would interest those working within the outreach or widening participation field as well staff who have direct contact with diverse student populations.

Biography:

A/Prof Sarah O’Shea has spent over twenty years working to effect change within the higher education (HE) sector through research that focuses on the access and participation of students from identified equity groups. Her institutional and nationally funded research studies advance understanding of how under-represented student cohorts enact success within university, navigate transition into this environment, manage competing identities and negotiate aspirations for self and others. This work is highly regarded for applying diverse conceptual and theoretical lenses to tertiary participation, which incorporate theories of social class, identity work, gender studies and poverty.

More information: https://scholars.uow.edu.au/display/sarah_oshea

Workshop 2
Equity and Employability in Higher Education

Workshop Description:

The development of employability is a shared concern for teachers, students and institutional leaders.This workshop engages attendees in an approach with which employability can be embedded in the existing curriculum without any extra time, resources or expertise. The approach positions employability development as the cognitive and social development of students as capable and informed individuals, professionals and social citizens. With a focus on ABILITY and equitable outcomes for all students, the workshop will first engage participants in a personalised self-assessment profile and the resources and strategies with which to embed employABILITY thinking. Participants will then work together to devise strategies for meeting the needs of specific equity cohorts. These will be trialled throughout 2020 with the intention of reporting back at the following EPHEA conference. The workshop will suit equity practitioners, teachers, program leaders, curricular designers, senior managers and careers advisors. No prior expertise or experience of employability development or career development learning is required. For more information, please visit http://developingemployability.edu.au/ or visit the student site at https://student.developingemployability.edu.au/

The NCSEHE website item is now here: https://www.ncsehe.edu.au/event/ephea-conference-2019-special-interest-group-equity-and-employability-in-higher-education/

Biography:

Dawn Bennett is Professor of Higher Education with Curtin University in Perth, Australia. Her research focus is the development of employability within higher education, including identity development and the nature of graduate work. A National Senior Australian Learning and Teaching Fellow and Principal Fellow of the Higher Education Academy in the United Kingdom, Dawn serves numerous editorial boards and convenes the Australian Learning and Teaching Fellows’ national network. She serves on the board of directors for ISME and Music Australia, and as a commissioner with the ISME Commission for Education of the Professional Musician. Publications are listed at Academia.edu.

Workshop 3
Embedding Indigenous Approaches and Pedagogies into Enabling Teaching Practice.

Workshop Description:

The workshop would outline Indigenous pedagogical principles and approaches and I would ask attendees to reflect on the principles and approaches they have in their courses. They would write them down and then talk to a partner or small group to see how they can connect with the principles you discussed. They would then come back to the whole group to discuss what they found illuminating and challenging in that activity and then I can offer suggestions for moving forward with those challenges.

 Biography

Dr Sharlene Leroy-DyerDr Sharlene Leroy-Dyer is a Guringai, Gadigal, Dhurag, Wiradjuri woman, who is the Program Convenor of the Yapug Program, the University of Newcastle’s enabling program for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. Sharlene was the first Aboriginal person to obtain a PhD in Management from the University of Newcastle. Sharlene also has a Graduate Certificate in Indigenous Research and Leadership from the University of Melbourne (UoM), and Bachelor of Business (Hons) from University of Newcastle (UoN).

Sharlene’s research interests centre around closing the gap on Indigenous disadvantage in education and employment. Sharlene convenes the Indigenous Enabling Special Interest Group within the National Association of Enabling Educators of Australia. Sharlene’s recent research collaborations include, mapping of enabling practices at the University of Newcastle, conceptualising enabling pedagogies, and improving Indigenous participation, retention and success in Australia business-related higher education. This research reaches across the five discipline areas of Management, Enabling Education, STEM, Education and Aboriginal Studies. Sharlene’s current research centres around Aboriginal enabling pedagogies, Aboriginal knowledges, decolonising pedagogies in Australia.

Workshop 4
Unconscious Bias – Activities to use with Staff in Support of De-biasing

Workshop Description:

By definition, we are unaware of unconscious biases. They occur when we make fast judgements, are tired or under pressure. Unconscious beliefs about various groups of people are a product of our life experiences and one of the ways we attempt to organise a complex world. However, when we make decisions about our people – staff or students – based on these unconscious or implicit biases they can produce errors, which are not harmless, fair nor inconsequential.

Many universities now give considerable attention to raising awareness about unconscious bias but without skills to back them up little may change, even for the most motivated.

The aim of this workshop is to share practical interventions, moving past awareness raising to personal and team strategies that can assist in mitigating bias.

Biography

Cathie Walsh is the Staff Equity Manager at the University of Auckland.  She has a background in psychology and has worked for many years in education, health and law primarily in the areas of equity and social justice.

Workshop 5
Taking a personalised and academic life cycle approach to understanding and responding to Equality Diversity and Inclusion issues in higher education

Workshop Description:

This workshop takes an academic life cycle approach to considering the challenges faced by different groups of vulnerable students in higher education. Participants will work in small groups to consider how groups such as Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME) students, care leavers, young carers, single parents, and students with mental health issues may be affected by different challenges at particular crunch points in the academic year and degree life cycle model built around the ideal of a ‘bachelor boy’ student (Edwards 1993). This will include considering how different groups may be affected at key points in the academic year such as transition to university, breaks or holidays, end of year, exams and graduation. This work draws together and builds on insights from my own work around HE participation over 15 years, including in particular research around single parents, care leavers, and students of Roma heritage as the most marginalised ethnic minority in Europe. This research focus is drawn together with my wider professional experience as an Equality Diversity and Inclusion (EDI) lead within my institution and also leading Teaching and Learning professional development with a focus on inclusivity for staff in my own University and working internationally including recently in Nigeria and Cambodia.

Together we will think about what practical changes we might need to make as individuals, institutions and a sector, in acknowledgement of the specific equality and diversity needs we identify. Finally, we will collectively audit which of these identified issues and approaches are really specific to our small group discussions around particular groups and moments, and which of these actually have more in common in informing wider principles under a wider umbrella of inclusive practice.

Biography

Tamsin Hinton-Smith is a Senior Lecturer in Higher Education at the University of Sussex in the UK. Her background is as a sociologist of gender and education, and she is a former Co-Director of the Sussex Centre for Gender Studies and current Deputy Director of the Centre for Teaching and Learning Research. Tamsin’s central research interests include around higher education participation by ‘non-traditional’ students, and experiences of (un)belonging and marginalisations.

Tamsin’s work has included around university students who are lone and teenage parents; care leavers; from Gypsy, Roma or Traveller (GRT) backgrounds; and young people living in areas where higher education participation is low. Tamsin commenced university as a single teenage parent herself. Recent sole and co-authored articles include  Higher education outreach: examining key challenges for academics. (2019), Roma women’s higher education participation: whose responsibility? (2018), The ‘success’ of looked after children in Higher Education in England: near peer coaching, ‘small steps’ and future thinking.(2018), and Negotiating the risk of debt-financed higher education: the experience of lone parent students. (2016).